Barnsley Beekeepers

The Apiarist Blog

The Apiarist Blog

Professor David Evans is a virologist studying the biology of single stranded positive sense RNA viruses, including poliovirus, hepatitis C virus and deformed wing virus of honeybees. He has a fascinating, practical beekeeping blog, https://www.theapiarist.org/

  • Synopsis : A hive stand provides a strong and stable support for hives, a space to work and protection for your back. A well designed hive stand should be easy to assemble, rot proof and able to cope with uneven ground. Here’s one I made earlier. Introduction Beekeepers can be passionate advocates of their particular […] The post The ultimate hive stand? appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : Bad behaviour by bees – aggression, following and stability on the comb – may be transient or permanent. To recognise it you need to keep records and have hives to compare. Fortunately, these traits are easy to correct by requeening the colony. Introduction That’s a pretty generic title and it could cover a […] The post Bad behaviour appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : What happens when your queenright cell raiser swarms? Are cells being reared under the supersedure response doomed? This and other musings on miscellaneous aspects of queen rearing, together with some comments on clearing supers on queenless hives. Introduction I described queen rearing last week as The most fun you can have in a […] The post More queen rearing musings appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : Queen cell selection by the beekeeper or the bees – which is more reliable? Nectar collection  and comb building by requeening colonies. Three miscellaneous queen rearing topics this week. Introduction May to July are the busiest months of the beekeeping season for queen rearing . We’re fast approaching the halfway point so I […] The post Queen rearing miscellany appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : Queens reared under the emergency response are numerous and preferentially started from eggs. The cells are then subjected to strong selection by workers after capping. What does this tell us about good quality queens and can we use this knowledge to improve our own queen rearing? Introduction In Eats, sleeps, bees I made […] The post The bees know best appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : From quick fixes to permanent solutions, Correx – extruded, twinwall, fluted polypropylene – has multiple uses in beekeeping. If you learn how to fold, stick and shape it you can save time, money and space. Here are just a few of the things I use it for. Introduction The Spring honey is almost […] The post Correx: cheap, light, useful. Choose any three appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : The beekeeping season is starting to get busy. Swarm control is not only essential to keep your hives productive, but also offers easy opportunities to improve the quality of your bees. Good records and a choice of bees is all you need. This week I discuss stock improvement together with a few semi-random […] The post Eats, sleeps, bees appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : Is clipping the queen a cruel and barbaric practice? Does it cause pain to the queen? Surely it’s a good way to stop swarming? This is an emotive and sometimes misunderstood topic. What do scientific studies tell us about clipped queens and swarming? Introduction After the contention-free zone of the last couple of […] The post Is queen clipping cruel? appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : The invariant timings of brood development dictate many beekeeping events including colony inspections, queen rearing and Varroa management. It makes sense to understand and exploit these timings, rather than ignore or fight against them. Introduction There are some inherent contradictions involving timing in beekeeping that can confuse beginners. Actually, they can confuse anyone – beginner […] The post Timing is everything appeared first on The Apiarist.
  • Synopsis : The presence of brood in all stages (of development) is an important indicator of the state of your colony. Is it queenright? Is it expanding or contracting? Quantifying the various developmental stages – eggs, larvae and pupae – is not necessary, but being able to determine changes in their proportions is very useful. […] The post Brood in all stages appeared first on The Apiarist.

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